Is Football Really Just a Game?

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Is Football Really Just a Game?

Callie, Staff

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After the College Football Playoff National Championship, I had the idea of writing a story that discussed the cultural and social phenomenon that football has become in America. In the wake of the Super Bowl, I’m forced to revisit this idea. Is football really just a game? Is it nothing more than a “physical…competition conducted according to rules with the participants in direct opposition to each other,” according to Merriam-Webster?

In the South, football is a required facet of the culture. When people move to a school, they are heavily questioned about the team they pull for and what connections they have to certain schools. For those who may not understand or enjoy the game, it is like being left behind in the dust. I vividly remember a point in early middle school where I began questioning every part of the game, simply to avoid feeling clueless during in-depth discussions of games.

It is even possible to make friends during games. My family went to Auburn’s national championship game against Florida State and I still remember hugging the fans around us when big plays or scores would happen. It was a wonderful bonding experience with some people I will probably never see again.

Conversations are started over the outcomes of big games in the days following. Once the season is gone, posts on social media flood in about how much the user misses college football. The countdowns to kickoff begin the second postseason play concludes.

Professional football is no different. In areas that aren’t the deep south, everyone seems to have a pro team that they will support to their dying breath. These fans endure freezing temperatures, miserable weather conditions, and sometimes outrageous ticket prices. Watching them in the stands during bad games is almost painful. Why do they go?

These are simply the things that connect us. You can greet someone based off of a college shirt they are wearing. You can start a conversation with a stranger, simply by asking “Hey, did you see the game last night?”. Without this simple bond, many people would be less conversational and passionate. It offers a connecting factor between very different people who can now share a common, strong link.

About the Writer
Callie, Staff

My name is Callie. I am ridiculously involved in almost every club ever. I am the treasurer of the Beta Club, secretary of Student Council, vice-president...

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Is Football Really Just a Game?